• Third Grade EPP (2019-20)

    Math Resources 

    • Stepping Stones Journals 
    • Math Notebooks  
    • ST Math 
    • Frist in Math 

    Third Grade EPP Curriculum Overview 

    We will work on Common Core State Standards and the 8 Mathematical practices using the program Stepping Stones.  We will work on enrichment activities to deepen our appreciation and passion for mathematics. 

    Homework Expectations 

    Students will be assigned homework every Friday. It will be due the following Friday. If your child has homework questions, encourage him/her to speak up and ask his/her teacher for help. 

     

    Current Math Topics

    Third grade EPPers are kind and hardworking. They work so well as a team, are developing strong problem solving skills, and demonstrate enthusiasm for learning. We have been working on Continental Math League Practice questions as math “Kick Off” starters and on homework assignments. Continental Math League is a national math competition where students complete 6 challenging math questions. It is designed to help students with reading comprehension and problem solving skills. Students are challenged to stretch their minds and think about problem solving in different ways. Third Grade EPP students will compete in three meets this year in January, February, and March. Good luck EPPers! 

     

    Recently students have been working on our Terrapin Logo Enrichment Unit. Students have created simple procedures and sub procedures to help them better understand angles and designs. This will be a program students will utilize in fourth and fifth grade EPP too.  

     

     Our next Enrichment Unit will be Pentominoes.  Pentominoes are geometric shapes formed by adjoining five squares. We will use these manipulatives to examine patterns, area, and to develop systematic approaches to solving challenging problems.

     

    We continue to explore and investigate patterns with multiplication and division. Students have a variety of strategies for multiplying efficiently. 

     

    After Thanksgiving break, we will strengthen our addition/subtraction of multi digit numbers using the standard algorithm. Students will compare and order fractions using number line, unit fractions, and greater than/less than symbols. Third graders will also use fraction tiles to add and simplify improper fractions. We will study perimeter, area, and volume. We will explore the Customary System and Metric System units of measure in length and capacity. Be ready to hear about Gallon Guy! 



    Trimester 2 Math Topics 

    • Multiplication & Division 
    • Perimeter, Area, and Volume  
    • Characteristics of Prisms and Pyramids 
    • Fractions, Improper Fractions, Mixed Numbers 
    • Gallons, Quarts, Pints, Cups
    • Liters 

     

    Enrichment Projects 

    • Probability
    • Pentominoes

     

    Math Resources 

    • Stepping Stones Journals 
    • Math Notebooks 

     

     

    Homework Expectations 

    Students will be assigned homework every Friday. It will be due the following Friday. If your child has homework questions, encourage him/her to speak up and ask his/her teacher for help.  Students are encouraged to work on ST Math at home. 

     

    VOCABULARY

    Standard Algorithm, Fraction, Whole, Numerator, Denominator, Fraction, Improper Fraction, Unit Fraction, Mixed Number, Number Line, Line Plot, Bar Graph, Area, Units, Square Units, Variable, Commutative Property, Identity Property, Associative Property, Prime, Composite, Factor, Factor Tree, Prime Factorization

     

    LEARNING TARGETS:

    Below are some of the learning targets we will focus on during our second trimester.

     

    • I can divide whole numbers with a divisor within 100 and with a whole number quotient with ease by picking and using strategies that will get to the answer quickly.
    • I can instantly recall from memory the product of any two one-digit numbers.
    • I can round whole numbers to the nearest 10.
    • I can round whole numbers to the nearest 100.
    • I can add within 1000 with ease by using an algorithm or strategy based on place value.
    • I can subtract within 1000 with ease by using an algorithm or strategy based on place value.
    • I can use other strategies for addition and subtraction within 1000 with ease.
    • I can multiply one-digit numbers by 10.
    • I can multiply one-digit numbers by multiples of 10 using strategies based on place value and operation properties.
    • I can show how rectangles with the same perimeter can have different areas.
    • I can show how rectangles with the same area can have different perimeters.
    • I can solve word problems involving perimeters.
    • I can apply the commutative property to decompose, regroup, and/or reorder factors to make it easier to multiply two or more factors.
    • I can apply the associative property to decompose, regroup, and/or reorder factors to make it easier to multiply two or more factors.
    • I can apply the distributive property to decompose, regroup, and/or reorder factors to make it easier to multiply two or more factors.



    COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS:

    Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 x 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations.  By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

     

    Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

    Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

    Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 5 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

     

    Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.

     

    Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators; e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2.  Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions; e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

     

    Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100.  Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors.  Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number.  Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite.



    Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.  Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.