• Fourth Grade EPP (2019-2020)

    Math Resources 

    • Stepping Stones Journals 
    • Math Notebooks 

     Fourth  Grade EPP Curriculum Overview 

    We will work on Common Core State Standards and the 8 Mathematical practices using the program Stepping Stones.  We will continue to work on enrichment activities to deepen our appreciation and passion for mathematics. 

     

    Homework Expectations 

    Students will be assigned homework every Friday. It will be due the following Friday. If your child has homework questions, encourage him/her to speak up and ask his/her teacher for help. 



    Trimester 2 Math Topics 

    • Measuring Angles with a Protractor
    • Adding & Subtracting Fractions
    • Line Plots 
    • Division with Remainders
    • Multiplying Fractions & Mixed Numbers
    • Mass: Pounds & Ounces
    • Capacity: Gallons, Quarts, Pints, and Fluid Ounces 
    • Comparing, Ordering, and Adding Decimals



    Enrichment Projects for Trimester 2

    • Probability 
    • Units, Units Squared, and Units Cubed 

     

    VOCABULARY

    Division, Quotient, Divisor, Dividend, Line Plot, Common Denominator, Mixed Numbers, Numerator, Denominator, Equivalent Fractions, Mass, Pounds, Ounces, Capacity Gallons, Quarts, Pints, Fluid Ounce, Decimals, Tenths, Hundreths, Thousandths 

     

    LEARNING TARGETS:

    Below are some of the learning targets we will focus on second trimester.

     

    ⚫ I can sketch angles with a given measurement.

    ⚫ I can use a protractor to create a given angle measurement.

    ⚫ I can explain that the angle measurement of a larger angle is the sum of the angle measures of its decomposed parts.

    ⚫ I can write an equation with an unknown angle measurement.

    ⚫ I can use addition and subtraction to solve for the missing angle measurements.

    ⚫ I can solve word problems involving unknown angles.

    ⚫ I can divide a multi-digit dividend (up to 4 digits) by a one-digit divisor and illustrate and/or explain my strategy.

    ⚫ I can explain why fractions are equivalent using models.

    ⚫ I can generate equivalent fractions by multiplying or dividing the numerator and denominator by the same number.

    ⚫ I can draw a model to prove why multiplying or dividing the numerator and denominator by the same number generates equivalent fractions.

    ⚫ I can compare two fractions by thinking about their size or location on a number line, or comparing them to a benchmark fraction (0/2, 1/2, 2/2).

    ⚫ I can compare two fractions by generating equivalent fractions with common denominators.

    ⚫ I can record the comparison using symbols (<, =, >) and justify each comparison.

    ⚫ I can explain that comparing fractions can only be done when they refer to the same whole.

     

    ⚫ I can use visual models to add and subtract fractions within the same whole.

    ⚫ I can use visual models to decompose a fraction in more than one way, such as breaking down a fraction into a sum of its unit fraction.

    ⚫ I can record decomposition in an equation.

    ⚫ I can add or subtract a mixed fraction using equivalent fraction, properties of operations, or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

    ⚫ I can solve addition and subtraction word problems using drawings, pictures, and equations.

    ⚫ I can explain why a/b = ax1/b by using visual models to show how to decompose fractions into unit fractions and represent it as a multiple of unit fractions.

    ⚫ I can decompose a fraction into a multiple of unit fractions.

    ⚫ I can solve word problems that involve multiplying a whole number and fraction with visual models and equations.



    Common Core State Standards

    Below are some of the standards we will focus on during Trimester 2. 

     

    1. Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n x a)/(n x b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size.  Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
    2. Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators; e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2.  Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions; e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
    1. Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement.
    1. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect the circle.  An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a “one-degree angle,” and can be used to measure angles.
    2. An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure of n degrees.
    1. Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor.  Sketch angles of specified measure.
    2. Recognize angle measure as additive.  When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts.  Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems; e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure.
    3. Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b.
    4. Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.
    5. Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation.  Justify decompositions; e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

    Examples:  3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8; 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8; 2 1/8 = 1 + 1 + 1/8 = 8/8 + 8/8 + 1/8.

    1. Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators; e.g., by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
    2. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole and having like denominators; e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.
    3. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number.Understand a fraction a/b as a multiple of 1/b.